How Do Sharks Sleep

Sharks have captured the imagination of different cultures for thousands of years. In many cultures sharks were revered as Gods, while other cultures used the personality of sharks to shape their folklore. Shark mythology was used as a way for early cultures to understand these amazing creatures before scientists were able study and document the facts about sharks. Most of these myths were from coastal and island cultures, where their seafaring lives led them to interact with sharks regularly.

Sharks In Greek Mythology

There are three notable Greek myths involving sharks:

 


 

 

  • The Myth of Lamia: Lamia was the daughter of the sea god Poseidon. She had an affair with the king of the gods, Zeus. When Hera, Zeus’ wife found out about the affair she stole and murdered Lamia’s children, which drove Lamia mad. To help her get revenge, Zeus turned Lamia into a giant shark monster so she could devour the innocent children of others as revenge.

 

 


 

 

  • The Myth of Cetus: After Andromeda, the princess of Aethiopia’s mother Cassiopeia, was bragging that her daughter was more beautiful than the sea god Poseidon’s daughters. Poseidon decided to take revenge by sending a giant shark/whale monster name Cetus after her. Luckily for Aethiopia, the legendary hero Perseus was able to save the day and kill Cetus.

 

 


 

 

  • Akheilos: Akheilos is the son of Zeus and Lamia and was a lesser known sea god with a shark head and a fiery fish body. Akheilos was turned into a shark as punishment after boasting that he was more attractive than the god of beauty Aphrodite.

 

 


 

Hawaiian Shark Gods

Hawaiians have a very complex mythology surrounding sharks. Hawaiians revered sharks, and their shark gods helped protect people and the islands. The major shark gods are:

 


 

 

  • Kamohoali’i: Kamohoali’i was the king of the sharks gods and guardian of the Hawaiian Islands. He could transform into both a human and a variety of different sea creatures to help people.

 

 


 

 

  • Ka’ahupahau: A shark goddess that was born a human. After being transformed into a shark god, she dedicated her life to protecting people from shark attacks.

 

 


 

 

  • Kane’apua: Was the trickster shark god, who could perform magical feats to entertain and delight all.

 

 


 

 

  • Keali’ikau ‘o Ka’u: Keali’ikau ‘o Ka’u fell in love with a human and gave birth to a green shark that would help people trapped at sea.

 

 


 

 

  • Kuhaimoana: Was a massive shark god that protected the Ka’ula islet and ensured fisherman had a bountiful catch.

 

 


 

 

  • Kane’i’kokala: Was a shark god that would save shipwreck victims.

 

 


 

Dakuwaqa: The Fijian Shark God

Dakuwaqa was a major god of the Fuji islands. Dakuwaqa was half shark, half man. He would help fishermen avoid danger at sea, protect people from ferocious sea monsters, and would help ensure a bountiful catch. In the Cook Islands, Dakuwaqa was known as Avatea, and was also the god of the sun and the moon. In Tonga, he was known as Takuaka and was a warrior god that would protect people from other vicious gods.

Lascu: The Half-Shark, Half-Octopus Sea Monster

Lascu is a half-shark, half-octopus sea monster with a bad temper from Bahaman mythology. Lascu is responsible for sinking ships, drowning swimmers, and causing whirlpools. Lascu is said to be responsible for the blue holes, or sinkholes found along the island. It is said she will make a sinkhole whenever the residents of an island have angered her.

The Leg Of Nohi Abassi

The native tribal people of Brazil and Guyana, believed that the constellation Orion’s belt was actually the leg of a hunter named Nohi Abassi. After tiring of his mother-in-law, Nohi abassi trained a shark to eat her. What he did not know is his mother-in-law found out and disguised her other daughter as the shark. Instead of attacking the mother-in-law, his sister-in-law attacked him and sawed off his leg. That leg became the constellation.

The Maori Myth Of Kawariki And The Shark Man

Kawariki was a princess who fell in love with a simple peasant boy Tutira. Her father, a sorcerer king was not happy and so he cursed Tutira, turning him into a shark. Rather than be defeated, the two still met in secret and would swim together at night. One day, there was a huge tsunami that destroyed the village and swept all the villagers out to sea. Tutira, as a shark, saved the villagers and brought them back to shore. Once Kawariki’s father realized the shark that had saved them was Tutira, he was so impressed with this heroic act, he turned Tutira back to a human and apologized by letting him marry Kawariki.

Zanzibar Myth Of The Monkey And The Shark

The myth of the monkey and the shark is a simple fable about how a monkey living in a fruit tree and a shark became friends. The monkey would help the shark eat fruit from the tree and the two would talk. To repay the monkey, the shark offered to take him on his back to his home for a big feast. Turns out the shark only befriended the monkey because his king was sick and needed a monkey heart to cure him. When the monkey found out the shark’s goals, he tricked the shark into thinking he had left his heart back at the tree. The shark took him back to the tree where the monkey climbed up and mocked the shark for being stupid. The moral of the story, never trust a shark or a monkey.

Shark myths and legends come from all over the world. In some legends they are fearsome sea monsters or tricksters, but in most they are helpful sea gods that protect people. These myths and legends helped us understand role of sharks in the world before we knew any scientific facts about sharks. These myths are fun to read and help us understand how our ancestors thought about sharks.